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FA18Demi4

The Ultimate FA-18 Demise

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Incredible photos from a jet accident in Canada ( Lethbridge ). Check out the sequence of the canopy leaving the scene, the pilot in his rocket-powered seat coming out, the parachute opening sequence, and the separated seat falling away.  Modern technology at its best. All of this happened in about two seconds from canopy off to the fireball. FA18Demi

Check out all the smoke from the canopy rocket motors.

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There he goes! So that’s what the striped handle does! The left engine has the nozzle fully open, showing that #1 engine was developing no power.

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The white thing is the seat-stabilazing drogue chute. Notice the pilot’s head pinned to his chest from the severe “g” forces produced by the solid rocket motors in the ACES II seat. They burn for about 2/10ths of a second . . enough time to propel him at least 60 feet clear of the aircraft. Hellova ride.

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One millesecond from eternity for a beautiful FA-18. Check out the now-unoccupied ejection seat following the aircraft to glory.

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The moment-of-impact photo shows flame shooting out of the left engine . . its “last gasp”. There goes the seat above the fireball. The pilot will be downing his first of several shots within the hour, soon as his hands stop shaking.

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And the pilot lived happily ever after . . .

Incredible photos from a jet accident in Canada ( Lethbridge ). Check out the sequence of the canopy leaving the scene, the pilot in his rocket-powered seat coming out, the parachute opening sequence, and the separated seat falling away.  Modern technology at its best. All of this happened in about two seconds from canopy off to the fireball. Check out all the smoke from the canopy rocket motors. There he goes! So that's what the striped handle does! The left engine has the nozzle fully open, showing that #1 engine was developing no power. The white thing is the seat-stabilazing drogue chute. Notice the pilot’s head pinned to his chest from the severe “g” forces produced by the solid rocket motors in the ACES II seat. They burn for about 2/10ths of a second . . enough time to propel him at least 60 feet clear of the aircraft. Hellova ride. One millesecond from eternity for a beautiful FA-18. Check out the now-unoccupied ejection seat following the aircraft to glory. The moment-of-impact photo shows flame shooting out of the left engine . . its “last gasp”. There goes the seat above the fireball. The pilot will be downing his first of several shots within the hour, soon as his hands stop shaking. And the pilot lived happily ever after . . .

The Ultimate FA-18 Demise

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